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Everything you wanted to know about batteries and some stuff you didn't...

To start off, we all know that person who has seen the crazy Facebook post or news story about a “vape” exploding. In most cases these unfortunate accidents can be prevented with the proper education and simple battery safety. Under safe use and correct parameters using these batteries is a safe thing that thousands of people do on a daily basis.
 
Let’s talk about battery chemistry…
There are several types of Li-ion batteries . The three letter codes are manufacturer codes, and used predominantly because they are easier to deal with than the longer naming conventions and have become a somewhat standard way to refer to the different types of cells. ICR and IMR cells are the most common types used and discussed here.

ICR = lithium cobalt oxide cylindrical cell
I = lithium ion
C =cobalt oxide cathode
R = round cell type
(note- proper IEC nomenclature for ICR secondary cells actually reads more like: carbon negative electrode, organic electrolyte, lithium cobalt oxide positive electrode, cylindrical cell. I’m just trying to simplify it some here)
ICRs are also sometimes called “LiCoO2” or “LCO” or “Li-cobalt”

IMR = lithium manganese oxide cylindrical cell
I = lithium ion
M =manganese oxide cathode
R = round cell type
IMRs are also sometimes called “LiMn2O4” or “LMO” or “Li-Manganese”

IFR = lithium iron phosphate cylindrical cell
I = lithium ion
F = iron phosphate cathode
R = round cell type
IFRs are also sometimes called “LiFePO4” or “LFP” or “Li-Phosphate”
These have a significantly lower nominal voltage (3.3v), and generally aren’t suggested for use in PVs of common design. Also, they require a special charger and have fairly low energy density. I just include them here as an overview of common battery types

INR = lithium iron phosphate cylindrical cell
I = lithium ion
N =nickel/manganese oxide cathode
R = round cell type
INRs are also sometimes called “LiNiMnCoO2” or “NMC”


Okay, so what sort of battery should I use for my mod?
Current consensus leans toward a quality IMR battery. They have a less volatile chemistry than ICR, generally higher amp limits, lower internal resistance, and are designed for high drain devices (they are commonly found in rechargeable cordless power tools). This isn’t a set-in-stone rule, but if you are unsure in any way, go with an IMR.
 
 
Battery Safety Tips:
 

  1. Do not under any circumstances use a sub-ohm coil or device on a battery or mod that is not specifically capable of working with sub-ohm resistance. If the battery, manufacturer, or description does not specifically say "Sub-ohm" do not use it to power a low or sub-ohm device.
Sub-ohm is anything below 1.0ohms.
 
Do not under any circumstances use a lower ohm coil or device on a battery or mod that is not specifically capable of working with that rated ohms or above.  If the battery, manufacturer, or description does not specifically say it can handle the ohms you are planning on using do not use it.
Low ohms are generally anything below 1.5ohms.
 
Basically do not use batteries or mods not specifically rated for your rated ohm devices. It can cause leaks, pressure, and much worse! Not all batteries are the same, low and sub-ohm batteries are specifically made to handle the demands.
 
  1. Do not leave a charging battery unattended for any reason
It is not safe to leave your house, have them charge over night or otherwise ignore them.  When batteries fail it is usually in a dramatic fashion: venting liquid, heat and even flame in rare cases.
 
You wouldn't leave the oven on; don't leave your batteries charging!
 
  1. Inspect your batteries for signs of leakage.
Look at the battery, if it is a mod battery, inspect the seals, the coatings, the ends, and look for torn seals, discolored areas or anything that doesn't look like it belongs. Do this every time you charge the mod battery!
 
If you have a sealed battery like an eGo, make sure to do all of the above as well. It's not as easy to see, but a bad eGo battery may show signs of danger as well.
 
  1. Do not store your batteries in a hot place, in direct sunlight or in a tightly enclosed space.
"Explosions" can happen when safety precautions aren't taken.
 
  1. Do not charge your batteries overnight.
This falls under Rule #1: "Do not leave charging batteries unattended!" Just don't do it.
 
  1. Check your charging cables
Look for liquid, debris or signs of warping, melting or anything out of the ordinary. If it looks like something is amiss, don't use it!
 
  1. Clean the tops of your eGo batteries.
Keep them clean of any residue, liquid or other debris, and check the charging cable connections well. Check every time you charge a battery!
 
  1. Keep odd battery problems in check
If your battery button sticks; if your battery is behaving unusually; if you even suspect there is something strange about the way your battery is working or charging, do not use it. It is not worth the price of a battery to risk anything happening.  When in doubt, throw it out! (Preferably in a safe manner at your local recycling center)
 
  1. Careful storage
Do not store a battery in your pocket, the actions of bending and twisting can turn on a battery, break a battery or otherwise cause damage. Do not store a battery in a purse with a device attached.
 
If this sounds like we are trying to scare you... you'd be right!
 
Batteries can be dangerous, can burn you and your belongings or, in rare cases, can start a fire.  This isn't just e-cig related, the same thing can happen to your RC car, rechargeable remote batteries or anything else requiring a rechargeable battery.